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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 251 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Mar 24, 2011 11:00pm PDT
immigrants adjust to life in the u.s. new life after amnesty, a lot of people were not able to immigrate because of a lack of money. still to this point, i see a lot of immigrants who want to get their work permits. i ask them how long they have been here. sometimes they have been here since the 1970's, 1980's, 1990's. a lot of them are elderly who are ready to retire. i had 165-year-old man who is alone, no family -- a 65-year- old man who is alone, no family here, but he does not have any papers to get that social security that he has contributed to for 30 years. he will be homeless after working for many years. i faced this situation with my clients a lot. i help low income people. sometimes it is very difficult. sometimes i think about how small the world is a and i see how immigration laws are changing. immigration rates started about 40 years ago and i started to see my client to come to me. my husband has been here 10 years and all of a sudden, his employer is asking for a work permit. we have two children. we just bought a home. what are we going to do? i could not prov
SFGTV2
Mar 1, 2011 5:00pm PST
presenting. after you left the military, what prompted you to go back to a place where the u.s. is engaged in military action? >> it is interesting. the population of afghanistan is around 29 million, and there's probably no more than 80,000 u.s. soldiers serving in afghanistan right now, but if you look at the stories that come out, you think the numbers are completely reversed. all the stories are about americans, and you see almost no images of stories about the afghan people themselves, so if you look at the dominant representational paradigm uc today, it is all about foreign soldiers. my idea was to try incurred counted to that a popularized narrative and focus on images and stories that really reflect that lived experience of conflict through the eyes of the afghan people. >> you are exhibiting with three other photographers. it is true all three of them have really focused in the areas where a lot of u.s. and allied forces are seeing action, are actually involved in combat, so your story is different than theirs. what does it mean to show your body of work along side of the
SFGTV2
Mar 14, 2011 3:30pm PDT
canvas depicting a woman washing the beach with her hair at the u.s./mexican border. the painting encourages the viewer to engage with the current debates over immigration and the politics of women and labor. influenced by the campaigns of the chicano civil rights movement, this oakland artist is a print maker whose work has helped and sustainability with the immigrant community as well as other current sociopolitical issues. this print-based work draws on appropriated agricultural worker manuals and high fashion labels to satirically address class issues, cultural identities, and consumerism. >> angelica -- her father was an agricultural worker, so she has drawn a lot from the materials the agricultural department sends to agricultural workers, referencing the depiction of farm workers and some of the information about pesticide application. >> mitzi combines a variety of media, including embroidery, to create artifacts of mexican, chicano, pop culture. she greets immensely detailed drawings of celebrities on the same platform of her friends and families. her work combines elemen
SFGTV2
Mar 11, 2011 5:30am PST
the private sector can find the solutions they cannot. man: in the u.s., roughly 90% of all water and wastewater systems are still publicly owned and publicly managed. the remaining 10% are managed by privately held companies. man: the private sector has learned to become very efficient, and frequently a municipality can save themselves a significant amount of money by bringing in a private company. this is not true in all cases. there are some exceptionally well-run municipalities, but they do have to deal with a city government system that is very hard to work within. paolicelli: there's several advantages to municipalities. they don't have to make a profit, so they're generally just trying to be break-even. and because of the importance of water, a lot of communities would be reluctant to give up control, but it is being looked at, especially on some of these troubled systems. cook: much of the business is in the mid-sized to smaller communities who have even fewer resources than the large cities, less expertise. if you take options off the table, it will be, well, what we've d
SFGTV2
Mar 24, 2011 11:00am PDT
creates a comprehensive program to address the violence and places women at the center of u.s. foreign policy for the first time in history. it supports measures to prevent violence,. text survivors, and brings perpetrators to justice. we have one of the three lead it drafters of this legislation. the bill was signed by the senate foreign relations committee and has a long way to go for passage. when you think about it, besides the incredible trauma violence is inflicting on our globe, the cost of global violence is huge. the cost of just partner violence, $6 billion per year. canada, $1 billion per year. the united kingdom, $23 billion per year. that is only one aspect. imagine if we took the time to record and tallied the global cost of all types of violence against women. it would be astronomical. man, unless you feel left out, don't worry, you are included in this. that america we have the proud distinction of being one of the most violent places for boys. one in five boys will be molested before they are 13. these figures are low because many -- when sexually abused boys are not t
SFGTV2
Mar 25, 2011 8:00am PDT
, michael walker. [applause] >> good evening. i'm michael walker, president of u.s. bank of northern california, and it is my pleasure to serve as chair of the 31st annual mfac good government awards. u.s. bank is honored to support these terrific city leaders because they are doing work that makes san francisco a wonderful place to work. those of you devote your careers to public service developed -- deserve the gratitude from those who benefit from the work you do but often times do not get the credit you so richly deserve. government works because people make it work. in this city alone, tens of thousands of dedicated public servants work every day to make sure we have functioning roads for commerce, great parts for our families, and strong safety nets for when we get sick or become unemployed. and they make sure that we do this using the taxpayers' money wisely. the individual and teams that we are honoring this evening are the backbone of our local government. our businesses, our families, and yes, our fund could not operate without the strong, healthy, and responsive government
SFGTV2
Mar 24, 2011 2:00am PDT
former u.s. assistant attorney, who has spent the last several years and 10 season working on television dramas such as "the practice" and "boston legal." next to him we have jamie floyd. broadcast anger for network news. many of you know her from her daily live broadcast "the best defense. next is a local attorney who has handled a number of high-profile cases including a nationally publicized acquittals of actor robert blake and civil rights lawyer stephen bingham. to his left is a career public defender from washington state. she is a blunder and has her own -- blogger and has her own blog. so'. does the media contributes to a negative misconception of public defenders, and more broadly, criminal defense attorneys? >> no, thank you. [laughter] >> absolutely yes. i think for the most part, there is the lack of understanding on the part of the american public on more critical role of the public defender. it is laid down in our sixth amendment. we do not teach it properly in primary school education. the public learned of it through the news media and come to some extent, thro
SFGTV2
Mar 10, 2011 10:00am PST
way finder. he was the u.s. representative at the venice bienale. essentially, they select their top artist in the year to represent the u.s. at that internationally-acclaimed art fair. tim hawkinson was chosen to represent the u.s. in 1999. he has had exhibitions at the l.a. museum of art, in sydney, and is shown in venues around the world. i would like to say that i am so thrilled to be able to have this work in our collection. i encourage you board of directors to approve this. >> thank you for your comments and time. now, luis. >> good morning, and directors. i want to first start by congratulating the vision of the joint powers authority in making the dutcstrategic decision thate transportation hub that will be built for the city and region is coming in and of itself, a work of art. the selection of the architects, designed a provided to the city and to this authority will provide san francisco, the region, and entire country with an iconic building. further, you have also taken a visionary position to include world-class art in this facility. i think that is in conjunction with
SFGTV2
Mar 23, 2011 10:00am PDT
talking about this new group called u.s. uncut. how many of you have heard of them? this is a group that just launched in the u.s. the point of the group is to expose corporations that don't pay taxes. we're constantly told we don't have any money, there is no money for child care or poor children or blind people, but the fact is a number of corporations, almost two-thirds, don't pay taxes. a lot of people asked about it during the break. they will have a major action on tax day, and just for the people who arrived, they shut down bank of america yesterday in washington, d.c., because the bank of america does not pay taxes. you will pay more taxes than bank of america. look that up, u.s.uncut.org. >> i am sorry, i missed my cue. i have three boys. does that help you decide where i was? thank you for inviting me today. it is an honor to be on this stage and that celebrate the 100th anniversary of the right to vote. as i began to write my speech for this event, i really started to struggle with the subject. the first draft, the participants, and the details leading up to gaining the right
SFGTV2
Mar 5, 2011 4:30pm PST
last year, california exported x 0.8 billion u.s. dollars to china, which is 28% more than the same period of last year. 35% is from the bay area. the year 2010 is also a very remarkable in the relationship between china and san francisco. last year, shanghai and san francisco celebrated the city's anniversary of the sister city relationship. three mayors of this city led a large delegation to shanghai and inaugurated the grand opening of the san francisco post at the world expo. they open their second office in beijing. last year, we maintained frequent exchanges and close cooperation and achieved new, substantial results. in the context of the new year, you have already had a promising beginning. as you know, one month ago, chinese president hu jintao paid a visit to this country and held productive talks with president obama. both our leaders declared their commitment to building a cooperative the partnership based on mutual respect and mutual benefits. his visit is important and will surely give new impetus to the overall development of our bilateral relations. in all 50 states,
SFGTV2
Mar 30, 2011 4:30pm PDT
have really focused in the areas where a lot of u.s. and allied forces are seeing action, are actually involved in combat, so your story is different than theirs. what does it mean to show your body of work along side of the stories that probably are more familiar? what kind of juxtaposition does that create for you as an artist? >> i think the strength of bringing the two different stories together is i think there is a real danger in focusing only on surface similarities between conflicts. when people look at a body of work and say that they see in this conflict photography, and it reminds them of somalia or iraq, i think that is dangerous because i think there are very unique elements to each conflict, and if you do not focus on the distinctions, you start to create a broader, watered-down topic, which is armed conflict, so i think it is important that when we focus on conflict, we make sure we do not just generalize, but we allow specific places and voices and people to be heard and we do not make these generalized assumptions about what conflict is like. >> the other phot
SFGTV2
Mar 8, 2011 2:30am PST
different. at the u.s. attorney's office, we had a press office. they were in charge of issuing press releases. those press releases extolled the wonderful work we did as prosecutors and it was always headed by the name of the current u.s. attorney who was looking to become a judge. the public defender's office needs to understand, it seems to me, that they are competing in a more complicated world when it comes to the media that existed 10 years ago. if they were a corporation, public defender's offices would have to except they have an image problem. they have a great product that the public does not understand. it seems to me one question we could ask is how can we help the public defender's office get that message out? and it matters. this is not for ego gratification. it matters because you are publicly funded. when it comes down to your budgets, the public defender's office has got to rely on the same funding sources as the presence, prosecutors offices, the courts. as stakeholders at the public trough, it seems to me, through some sort of martyr complex -- which i respect -- th
SFGTV2
Mar 19, 2011 7:30pm PDT
. after three days we got out. my husband had hired un rights lawyers, the u.s. embassy was involved, and said you have to get out before the weekend or you will be raped or killed. the experience has forever changed me. every day i think about how lucky i am to be standing here. how will show you a clip of the movie, "tapestries of hope." young girls are being abused and have nowhere to turn. >> they think that the virgin's blood it is so pure that it has healing power. >> the girls have been ostracized by the very society that advises men that raping virgins can cure hiv aids. >> the youngest are one day old. >> and fight she does. i knew i had to go to zimbabwe. but first day there we were stopped by the central intelligence agency. we had to be careful. he will stand by it silently while girls are harmed. -- he will not stand by silently while girls are harmed. >> you don't have to be so hard on yourself >> they heard of a girl who needed to be rescued. i was going to go out, but we never made it. >> they will be deported. am i was told by the u.s. embassy if i did not get out by
SFGTV2
Mar 15, 2011 12:00pm PDT
would bet you that we are on more national papers in china then we were in the u.s.. i caught my first congratulations. i got my first e-mail with an hour from a cousin of mine who is living in shanghai. this is a global economy. then we will be hosting a conference for the region to talk about how we can improve our import and export markets and this is a part of the future. we talked about hospitals being built in san francisco. we are taking over -- we are catching up on the retail and oakland has been underserved. there is a lot of complicated reasons for that. we are going to be giving special developmental incentives for retail development along the corridor to try to return some of the retell back to oakland. this is one of the most profitable. there is an under arch need in oakland and this is a good time to come in. this area is extremely underserved. almost every woman in oakland told me that they needed more shopping. that is a powerful source of funds. we are the cultural and entertainment center for the east bay. we have people moving into the valley because they wan
SFGTV2
Mar 12, 2011 12:00am PST
being allowed to enter the u.s. in this reading, writer nancy om, takes the audience to angel island. >> palm trees faced us when we landed. they were like garred yens to pass the golden gate we told them what wement todd hear. on the island of desperate dreams we shed our skins and wore new ones. burned our parents name and let our pasts curl into smoke. >> no longer my father's daughter. no longer my husband's wife. only the sea gulls know who i really am. for months we were held in separate rooms. the dampness seeped through the bunks and gnawed or bones. at night the wales of ghosts kept us awake. 32 steps to my father's house, 4 windows facing north. 24 steps to my uncle's house, 2 doors facing south. i have 3 sisters, 2 brothers, 4 cousins on my father's side. now i store the memory in a drawer. along with bitter herbs and rhineos ris horns. we dine at restaurants on the better side of town with pink table cloths and real flowers in the vases. we hardly go to china town. >> in a casual way, they had fun with his body. they chained him to the back of the car and did fish
SFGTV2
Mar 22, 2011 5:30am PDT
referral for you or someone you know, call 1-800-662-help. brought to you by the u.s. department of health and human services. people who suffer from drug or alcohol addiction sometimes say hurtful things. they drive the people who love them most away. if you know someone who suffers from drug or alcohol addiction-listen. try to hear what they are really saying. know that there is hope and help them find their voice again. for drug or alcohol treatment referral for you or someone you know call 1-800-662-help. brought to you by the u.s. department of health and human services. [music] hi, i'm michele monroe with the road to recovery and we're here today in maryland getting some opinions on what people think about different languages used in the substance abuse and mental health arena. if i said that somebody had a drug and alcohol addiction what would you think that that means? i think the person has a... a certainly health issue problem that needs to be, needs to be attended to. i would think of people struggling in difficult circumstances... with certain underlying issues that, tha
SFGTV2
Mar 4, 2011 10:00am PST
u.s. congress and subsequently was decried and defended worldwide, a man who has continued to explore topics that others may see as off limits, andres serrano. thank you. that had to be a difficult period for you, a piece of art you created that involved a crucifix immersed in your own urine. i've heard observers say that if you did not know the content, you would think it was a very respectful piece of art, respectful towards religion. and yet the controversy surrounding that work led to jesse helms calling you a jerk on the floor of the u.s. congress, and you were-- you were vilified in the political world. what was that experience like? it was like something out of kafka where i wake up in the morning and found myself being denounced in congress. and of course, i never imagined that it would happen. the piece was not intended to be offensive or provocative, you know. at the time, i barely had any kind of reputation or audience so i didn't expect for it to do what it did. but, you know, it had its ups and downs, to say the least. (anderson) it was part of a larger series. you were w
SFGTV2
Mar 5, 2011 9:30am PST
things happen in prison today. the u.s. has 5% of the world's population and over 25% of the world's prison population. that is a big part of the equation. i am not waiting for superman, but somebody might be. if you look at the conditions of our schools, our schools have not been restructured, have been left alone to become the perfect feeder to prison prefatory. public schools are designed -- if you have any spirit, the spirit of a claudette colvin, they do not want to adapt to you. folks always ask, where are our leaders? they are in rikers island, san quentin, some of the greatest minds which had not found a space to tap into their genius. that is a big part of what has happened. not talking about the prison industrial complex as well as the military industrial complex. rikers island has 1400 people -- 14,000 people. i worked at a high-school that had a mural on the wall. there was a figure, a man dressed in green, split in two. the front have has a gun, a rifle in his hand, military fatigues. the back half has the prison inmate uniform. on top it says choose your dream. so those
SFGTV2
Mar 9, 2011 10:00am PST
, auntie, big sister, all in one, for me. she has taught in canada, the caribbean, and the u.s. and has been involved in the development of teachers for two decades. she consults on anti-racist inclusion very and equitable education. she assists school districts and schools to continually restructure themselves for equitable outcomes for all students. the initiative put that puts race -- she designed the initiative that puts race on the table. she is the virtual scholar for teaching for change. she is the author of "reality check," a major report on education. maybe conversation began. >> this is an occasion when we are going to talk across generations. these two guests here. and then we have some time for you to talk with them. the afternoon is full, and we are on to a little bit of a late start, so let me tell you how we hope to go. we will begin with ms. colvin giving 10 minutes of her very long and illustrious life in terms of work for civil rights. just 10 minutes. then, bryonn bain, whose life is not as long but illustrious nonetheless, will give 10 minutes also with some trauma a
SFGTV2
Mar 6, 2011 3:00am PST
street was the confederate cemetery. from the courthouse, they flew two flags -- the u.s. flag and the confederate battle flag, which was the state flag of south carolina. from the court room, i could look out the window and seaport sumter in the distance -- see fort sumter. they put me on a case with no marijuana. they invented imaginary marijuana. they said i was charged with conspiring to contribute 10 tons of colombian marijuana. i pled not guilty. i had a jury trial. i was found guilty on one account, acquitted on nine. i had an appellate case and the supreme court case. i was then facing 15 years. since may to nine. when i went to federal prison, i did time in eight different states in nine different federal prisons, including four penitentiaries -- that is a maximum security. including the united states penitentiary at marion, the first super federal max. that is on a marijuana convention. -- conviction. i spent most of my time in solitary confinement. you do not know this, but if you plead not duty and you get a jury trial and then you have an appellate case, you go directl
SFGTV2
Mar 22, 2011 2:00am PDT
panelists. to my immediate left is jonathan shapiro, an attorney and former u.s. assistant attorney, who has spent the last several years and 10 season working on television dramas such as "the practice" and "boston legal." next to him we have jamie floyd. broadcast anger for network news. many of you know her from her daily live broadcast "the best defense. next is a local attorney who has handled a number of high-profile cases including a nationally publicized acquittals of actor robert blake and civil rights lawyer stephen bingham. to his left is a career public defender from washington state. she is a blunder and has her own -- blogger and has her own blog. so'. does the media contributes to a negative misconception of public defenders, and more broadly,
SFGTV2
Mar 2, 2011 12:00am PST
with our u.s. senator barbara boxer, who chairs the most powerful committee of the environment and public works; our governor, arnold schwarzenegger, who is a leader in reducing green house emissions, and our legislator don perada and gerald huffman who you will hear from later on in the program, and of course our mayor, gavin newsom. gavin newsom has been a leader of the environment before it was the sexy thing to do. he has been responsible for putting solar power at moscone center; responsible for putting power at san francisco international airport; responsible for putting solar power at the waste water facility in the bayview hunter's point. he will be responsible for putting power on our libraries, on our schools, and everywhere possible in the city and county of san francisco. we're very fortunate that this mayor has been the first mayor to create a climate action plan that will reduce the green house emissions by 20 percent by the year 2012. this mayor has also been a leader and innovation and we're looking at creating -- in harnessing paddle power below the golden gate bri
SFGTV2
Mar 30, 2011 10:30pm PDT
something. also, we have a rock piece of land. we have to have a resolution. >> in the u.s., about 2/3 of the population lives in areas that are prone to landslides. about $2 billion of damage occurs annually from landslides. unfortunately, 20-25 million people die as a result of landslides o. >> much of the coastline is either a bright red or a beige print th. >> here we are at the base of telegraph hill on lombard street. this is owned by the city. behind you is a large piece of something exposed. you are looking at a large class that was xextricated in a quarry about hundred years ago. this is a secretive sandstones, shales, accumulated debris. essentially it ended up piled up here. the quarry activity was so intense and they used some much at dynamite that the kind of over blasted. 10 feet of the face was left shattered. you can see the fresh colors and a pile of debris which is precariously perched on the edge of a cliff up there. it is more fresh and more recent than the rest. it stands out because there's no vegetation. there is no weathering of material. those are the kinds of thi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 251 (some duplicates have been removed)